Frozen

March 9, 2014 6 Comments

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Let it Go!

I had no intention of seeing this film.  I am not a big fan of Pixar (with a few exceptions such as “UP”) and don’t need to explore the tale of one more Disney Princess.  Still, as a therapist, I kept hearing about this film.  Over and over.  I finally saw it and I must tell you on this post-Oscar weekend, I gladly joined the throngs singing (pun intended) its praises.

Let it Go!

Frozen has grossed over 900 million dollars since it opened in November 2013.

Its story is both timeless and innovative.  Girl Power is certainly a hot topic (think Girl with the Dragon Tatoo and Hunger Games),  but this is a wonderful story of two sisters whose relationship is threatened by the power one sister (Elsa) possesses and has no clue about how to safely use.  (sound familiar?).  The animation is beautiful.  The music is catchy, sung beautifully and somehow manages NOT to annoy.  The anthem “Let It Go” is sung by Elsa when she finally decides to go full tilt with all that she possesses, albeit in a lonely frozen palace.  Can a girl have power AND relationships?  That’s what Frozen is about.  The sidekick characters (Olaf the snowman who loves summer) are actually endearing.  And no, it still doesn’t pay to be a parent in a Disney film.

Let it Go!

There are numerous Disney-moments in this film, but there are ample Disney-moments in our current culture.  So be it.

This film brought a tear to my eye and certainly left me feeling acceptable to \

Let it Go!

(Can 1 billion dollars worth of girl viewing be wrong?)

This is a must see!

Jolyn Wagner

Must See Movie of the Week
6 Comments to “Frozen”
  1. Bruce Russell says:

    What is “Let It Go” about? I think it’s about letting go of the fear we have about being ourselves, the fear that others will be harmed and won’t love us. And this does happen when Elsa let’s it go. Letting it go might be necessary, but it’s not sufficient, for getting what we want. What more must be added? That’s what this film is about. Anna is the hero. She has the answer, and it’s not girl power.

  2. Jolyn Wagner says:

    I agree that girl power is necessary but not sufficient in the film or in life
    It seems that neither Elsa nor Anna have the answer and learn that they need each other. I think that’s the answer
    Without Anna, Elsa is alone in her palace
    Without Elsa, Anna falls for the bad guy
    Together they have power (connection)
    And I haven’t even mentioned the snowman who was also a hero!

  3. Jolyn Wagner says:

    I agree that girl power is necessary but not sufficient in the film or in life
    It seems that neither Elsa nor Anna have the answer and learn that they need each other. I think that’s the answer
    Without Anna, Elsa is alone in her palace
    Without Elsa, Anna falls for the bad guy
    Together they have power (connection)
    And I haven’t even mentioned the snowman who was also a hero!

  4. Jolyn Wagner says:

    I agree that girl power is necessary but not sufficient in the film or in life
    It seems that neither Elsa nor Anna have the answer and learn that they need each other. I think that’s the answer
    Without Anna, Elsa is alone in her palace
    Without Elsa, Anna falls for the bad guy
    Together they have power (connection)
    And I haven’t even mentioned the snowman who was also a hero!

  5. Jolyn Wagner says:

    Yikes
    3 identical entries
    Sorry

  6. Bruce Russell says:

    I don’t think it’s essentially about power, girl or otherwise. The more general issue is the conflict people sometimes face between being themselves and having the love they want. Gay children sometimes face this: to be themselves, they must live a gay life, but it risks losing the love of their parents and some friends. To be myself, I need to be a philosopher, but it risks alienating people I love because it sometimes involves being critical of them and/or their views. To be herself, Elsa cannot hide her frozen touch. But then to avoid harming Anna and alienating her subjects, she has to retreat to an ice palace. There is no love from others there.

    Second, I don’t think that without Elsa, Anna falls for the bad guy. She may well have found a Sven who truly loves her. And even if that’s false, it’s only accidentally true that what Elsa does prevents Anna from falling for the bad guy. She was not trying to prevent Anna from falling for the bad guy when she decided to stop closely monitoring herself and allow her frozen touch to be manifest.

    In sum, the theme is more general than a conflict between power and relationships. I think it’s about the conflict between being yourself and relationships (or love). And the benefits equation is asymmetric: Elsa needs Anna to melt her heart. Sven could have melted Anna’s heart and, I suspect, would have had the bad guy not attacked Elsa.

    P.S.–Do you have the xerox touch?!!

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